Waste management Whitstable

Lili Waste is a premier waste management service provider. Starting at £7 per bin we are proud to offer the best customer service while maintaining the lowest rates. With our own private fleet, Lili Waste services all areas in Kent, including Whitstable .

Please send an email today or call us now to receive a quote for your business waste, food waste, general waste, glass waste, cardboard collection or any other waste management service. Our team of dedicated experts will be more than eager to offer you our best quote. All our customers receive free waste management bins and if you order your bin before 4pm you will receive your bin the next day!

Business waste services in Whitstable

Whitstable sea front, Kent.

Whitstable sea front, Kent.

By choosing Lili Waste Services for your business waste collections you are enjoying the best waste management service against the lowest cost. Lili Waste is a direct service provider meaning that we own our fleet. As of this we are able to offer the best service against the lowest cost. We are NOT a broker!

Business waste needs to be removed by a licensed waste management service provider and Lili Waste holds all the certificates and licenses as required by law. An overview of all our waste management licenses may be found here: Certification & Policies.

For our business waste collections in Whitstable we offer the following bins and skips

  • Bin bags

  • 240 litre

  • 360 litre wheelie bin

  • 660 litre

  • 1100 litre

  • Mini/midi/large skips

  • Rear end loader

  • Closed skips.

For more information about our bins and skips please click here.

Glass waste collections in Whitstable

Lili waste offers special glass waste services that allow for the recycling of these materials. Considering the weight, Lili Waste has special bins for glass waste and will collect this during specific designated routes in Whitstable. Please contact us today for more information.

Cardboard collection in Whitstable

Besides general waste and glass waste we also offer cardboard collection services. Due to our dedicated cardboard collection routes you will benefit from scheduled collection times and the lowest rates.

Waste management at Lili Waste means

  • The lowest rates

  • Best customer service

  • Direct service provider

  • NO broker

  • Free bins for our customers

  • We always aim for zero landfill

Lets keep Whitstable clean and let us take care of your waste management

Archaeological finds indicate that the Whitstable area was inhabited during the Palaeolithic era, the Bronze Age and the Iron Age. Oysters were harvested in the area in Roman times. The remains of a Roman building have been found in the centre of the town. Charters indicate that there were Saxon settlements where salt production and coastal trade occurred.

The town was first recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, under the name Witenestaple, meaning "the meeting place of the white post", which referred to a local landmark. At that time, Witenestaple was the administrative centre of the hundred of Witenestaple which stretched from the coast to the village of Blean, 3 kilometres (2 mi) north of Canterbury. In addition to Witenestaple, the hundred contained three manors at Seasalter, Northwood and Swalecliffe.

The Seasalter and Swalecliffe manors were owned by the church, and the manor at Northwood was run by a noble family on behalf of the king. Fisheries were located at the Seasalter manor, saltworks were at the Northwood manor, and pigs were farmed at the forest in Blean. By 1226, the name of the area had evolved into Whitstaple. Saltworks were opened at the Seasalter manor around the turn of the 14th century, and a sea wall was built there in 1325 to prevent coastal flooding. The history and development of the town has determined and been determined by the shape and location of the coast which has changed in a complex way over recorded history due to natural events and human interventions.

By 1413, the three manors had combined to form the Whitstaple manor, and had been sold to a religious foundation in Essex. The manor was seized by King Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, and was given to the Minter family (an old noble family, originally from Ickham. Branches of this family still survive today in the same area). A Royal Patent was granted in 1574 to the manor owner for the fishing of its oyster beds, and in the same year, the lands at Tankerton were incorporated into the manor. A copperas works was established at Tankerton in 1588, which operated until about 1830. By 1610, the name Whitstaple had become Whitstable.

Around the mid-18th century, goods and passengers began to be transported by ship between London and Whitstable, and a toll road was built to the cathedral city of Canterbury. These improvements in transport led to the town's development as a seaside resort; the first advertisements for bathing machines at Whitstable appeared in 1768. In 1790 the manor was sold to private landowners, and three years later the rights to harvest the oyster beds were bought by the newly established Company of Free Fishers and Dredgers of Whitstable, the successor to the Whitstable Company of Dredgers. Between roughly 1775 and 1875 the well smacks or early longliners out of Barking and other local fishing ports would collect lugworms and whelks from Whitstable's bait-diggers and dredgers before beginning their tour for prime fish north to Iceland. Whelks suspended in net bags in the well could live for a while due to circulating fresh water.

On 3 May 1830, the world's first steam-hauled passenger and freight railway service was opened by the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway Company. Designed by William James, the line ran six miles (10 km) from Westgate in Canterbury to Whitstable town centre. The railway line's initials—C&WR—and Whitstable's shellfish industry eventually led to its nickname, the Crab And Winkle Railway.

Trains were driven by a locomotive for part of the journey, but on inclined planes were pulled on ropes by steam-driven stationary winding engines located at Tyler Hill and Clowes Wood. The locomotive used was the Invicta, an 0-4-0 inclined cylinder tender locomotive built by Robert Stephenson, the son of engineer George Stephenson. Whitstable harbour was opened by the railway company in 1832, and the rail line was extended to enable goods, mainly coal, to be directly transferred from ships onto the trains. In 1834, the world's first season tickets were issued for the C&WR line.

The Invicta locomotive was retired in 1840 and replaced by horses until a third winding engine was built at South Street. The Invicta was kept for scrap, but in 1898 work began on its restoration, which continued intermittently until its completion in 1977 by the National Railway Museum in York. On 3 May 1980 the locomotive was returned to Canterbury to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the line.

Around the time of the construction of the Whitstable to Canterbury line, the local Gorrell stream was diverted into what was known as the Backwater reservoir, so as to prevent the railway needing to cross the estuary of the stream on damp and unstable land. The Gorrell Backwater was then filled through the stream itself as well as rain water drainage when the tide was in, and whilst out the water would be released into the newly built Whitstable Harbour. The reservoir unfortunately would contribute to the flooding of the town during years when the reservoir could not be drained, such as in 1897 and 1953 when weather conditions were exceptionally bad. This continued into the late 1960s, when fire engines were used to pump out large quantities of the water to prevent further flooding.

In the early 1970s, the present Gorrell Tank was built underground, with the Gorrell Car Park being in service above ground since.

In 1845, the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway Company was bought by the South Eastern Railway, who introduced steam locomotives capable of operating along the entire length of the railway. A direct rail route from Whitstable to London was established in 1860 when the London, Chatham and Dover Railway opened a station on what is now the Chatham Main Line. On 16 November 1869, 71 buildings in the town were destroyed by a fire which started at a shop near the harbour. In about 1856 the first branch of the Sea Cadet Corps, then known as the Naval Lads' Brigade, was established in the town by the Reverend Henry Barton.

A plant to manufacture tarmacadam was built beside Whitstable Harbour in 1936. The harbour gradually fell into decay after the Second World War, but in 1958 the Whitstable Urban District Council purchased and repaired the harbour with the intention of rejuvenating the town's economy.

By the early 20th century, the Oyster Company of Free Fishers and Dredgers had become the Whitstable Oyster Fishery Company. 'Native Oyster' collection drastically declined in the first half of the 20th century and then ceased due to pollution, disease, bad weather and underinvestment. An attempt to farm Pacific Oysters on the foreshore was initiated in 2016 and is currently the subject of an investigation by the Marine Management Organisation after allegations about the racks causing safety issues and blocking navigation for watercraft and swimmers.

The Crab and Winkle Line finally closed in 1953, but about a third of the line was reopened as a footpath and cycleway in 1999 under the stewardship of a local charity, the Crab and Winkle Line Trust. One of the main developments to the town in recent years was the Horsebridge project. Completed in 2005, it was designed to regenerate a dilapidated area of the town with the construction of new shops and houses, a town square, and a community centre with a performance space and art gallery.

In such a beautiful area as Whitstable, Lili Waste is proud to offer the best business waste services available.

Source: Wikipedia

Besides Whitstable we also offer waste management services in Bexleyheath, Dartford, Erith, Sevenoaks, Tonbridge, Tunbridge Wells, Maidstone, Paddock wood, Rochester, Hawkhurst, Staplehurst, Deal, Gravesend, Marden, Dover, Margate, Sittingbourne, Herne Bay, Canterbury, Ramsgate, Ashford, Isle of Sheppey, Hythe, Folkestone, Faversham, Rochester, Chatham, Aylesford, Gillingham, Cranbrook

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